December 20, 2006

IRA/Sinn Fein Ethnic Cleansing

Listen to loyalists

December 19, 2006

16 Sep 2005 – http://www.bbc.co.uk

The head of the Anglican church in Ireland, Lord Eames, wants the government to listen to loyalist concerns in Northern Ireland.

His comments follow rioting last weekend which broke out during an Orange Order parade in Belfast. Fergal Keane reports.

Trivia: Henry VIII

December 19, 2006

In 1534, Henry VIII and England made a decisive break with the Roman Catholic Church led by the Pope and appointed himself Supreme Head of the Church of England.

Need for a son
Henry VIII reigned from 1509-47 and was the second Tudor king. His father, Henry VII, had won the Wars of the Roses in the 1480s but the family still had enemies. Henry needed a son to secure the throne for the Tudor dynasty.

Divorce denied
Henry’s wife, Katherine of Aragon, had failed to produce a son and heir, and by the mid 1520s, Henry had fallen in love with Anne Boleyn. On Henry’s orders, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey was sent to Rome to petition the Pope for a divorce. However, following pressure from both Henry’s wife and her powerful nephew, the German Emperor, the Pope refused Henry’s request. Wolsey was blamed and imprisoned.

Read the rest of this entry »

Battle of the boyne (part 1)

November 22, 2006

November 22, 2006

Battle of the boyne (part 2)

Profile: Ian Paisley

November 21, 2006

For more than three decades, Ian Paisley has been a towering figure on Northern Ireland’s political stage.

A half century after he first emerged, Mr Paisley’s determination to resist any compromise which might, in his view, weaken Northern Ireland’s position within the United Kingdom has remained absolute.

His politics and religious beliefs are inextricably linked and the Free Presbyterian Church, which he founded in 1951, remains the cornerstone.

Mr Paisley’s large stature and booming voice first attracted major public attention in 1963 when he organised a protest march against the decision to lower the union flag at Belfast City Hall to mark the death of Pope John.

A year later, he threatened to tear down an Irish Tricolour displayed in a Belfast Sinn Fein office, if the authorities did not remove it first.

The authorities attempted to prevent the Paisley march. But in removing the flag themselves, they sparked the worst riot that Belfast had witnessed in decades.

Read the rest of this entry »

Rocco – Comes to Be

November 18, 2006

The Ulster-Scots & Southern Confederacy

November 17, 2006

On both sides of the Atlantic there has been an avalanche of books and articles, both scholarly and popular, which have been about the American Ulster-Scots or ‘Scots-Irish’ -(1). For example the Ulster Society’s Ronnie Hanna has written many readable biographies on notable Americans of Ulster-Scots lineage. The Newsletter’s Billy Kennedy has given the average reader a greater understanding of our American kinfolk in his state-by-state series on the Ulster-Scot settlements. Interestingly, three out of four of the Kennedy books are about the Ulster-Scots in certain states, which became part of the southern Confederacy in 1861. What was the relationship between the Ulster-Scots and the short-lived Confederate States of America? To answer this question one must recount American history from colonial times.

Read the rest of this entry »

Ulster Divided Land

November 16, 2006

 

The real facts of the divided land in Northern Ireland.

10 Facts About The Orange Order!

November 15, 2006

Orange Order

1) Famous Orangemen have included Dr Thomas Barnardo, who joined the Order in Dublin, William Massey, who was Prime Minister of New Zealand, Harry Ferguson, inventor of the Ferguson Tractor, and Earl Alexander, the Second World War general.

2) Commemorations of the Battle of the Boyne predate the Orange Order. The Order was formed in 1795 and its first parade was held in 1796, but there is a record of a Twelfth parade in County Armagh in 1791, suggesting that the tradition of parades goes back well beyond the Order’s formation.

3) The Orange Order is an all-Ireland body, with lodges in Cavan, Monaghan, Leitrim, Dublin and Donegal. The only Twelfth procession in the Republic nowadays is at Rossnowlagh in County Donegal. There are almost 1200 lodges in Ireland, most of them in Northern Ireland

Read the rest of this entry »


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.